Lost & FoundLost Stories

Madrid’s lost stories (Vol. VI)

26 December 2018

Would you love to see trees, grass and fountains on Plaza Mayor again? Me too. The same can’t be said for the other lost stories I’ve dug up, however. Open-cast construction sites, cars parked in unthinkable places, and a city at war are all part of Madrid’s endlessly fascinating past… 

WHEN PLAZA MAYOR WAS A PARK

Madrid’s most famous square has undergone some very drastic transformations over the decades: from park, to car park, to a square purely for tourists and more tourists.

I’m a fan of how it was in this photograph – all green and lush, with plenty of benches to sit on before the sun became too hot. And, imagine this… none of the apartments you’re looking at in this photo were Airbnbs back in 1860.

Plaza Mayor, 1860

OUTSIDE PLAZA MAYOR, PRE-PEDESTRIANISATION

Head out from Plaza Mayor and find this pretty street, which is now pedestrianised. The two-storey building you see below is now four stories tall. That’s what 50 years does to Calle Postas…

THE CONSTRUCTION OF ATOCHA METRO, 1980

Most of Madrid’s metro was built in this method, where the ground was opened up exposing forgotten convent cemeteries and the odd fossil, in order to place the subterranean tracks beneath our feet.

Atocha station, 1986

LIFE PRE-RADAR

What listening out for enemy planes once looked like.

Enemy planes detectors

A TANK IN FRONT OF THE PALACE

This very surreal sight was captured during the Spanish Civil War, around 1936. There are very few traces of the Spanish Civil War outside of black and white photographs such as this one, but trust me, I’m on the hunt for the real-life, concrete evidence.

A tank by the palace

A GLIMPSE OF AN OLD LAVAPIÉS

The statue of Agustín Lara now stands where the white van is, and the square is also no longer named after him either: it’s now called Plaza Arturo Barea, named after a journalist who covered the Spanish Civil War, and of whom George Orwell was a big fan.

The grass is gone, as is that very broken bench. And the Western Wing of the church has been demolished to make way for today’s Mercado San Fernando.

Plaza Arturo Barea

Want to read more of Madrid’s lost stories? Dive into Volume V right away.

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